New ideas and perspectives focused on results

“Where there is no vision, there’s no hope.” -- George Washington Carver

Leaders, by design, are supposed to inspire their employees. In order to do so, they must create relationships and an environment that supports and motivates people. And that starts with the company’s mission and vision. Employees buy into those tenents and trust in them. As the George Washington Carver quote states, when leaders underestimate the importance of the mission, they’re in trouble. However, leaders are in even deeper trouble when employees don’t trust them.

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Many people think that a leader has to be an outgoing and extroverted people person. Because of this, introverts can be overlooked for leadership opportunities. However, just because someone is shy, that doesn’t mean they can’t be a great leader. A number of leaders we work with who appear to be extroverts are self proclaimed introverts.

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It’s the age-old leadership question: Is it better to be loved or feared? And an August study published online in the "Journal of Business and Psychology" finds there are advantages and disadvantages to both.

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You’re working diligently at your desk when your supervisor stops by your cubicle with yet another business initiative they want you to spearhead (remind you of anyone?). What he doesn’t realize -- or take the opportunity to look into -- is that you’re leading the efforts on several side projects, in addition to your day-to-day tasks.

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With the increase of technology and sophisticated work tools, more and more employees are working from coffee shops, couches and the virtual office. In fact, 52 percent of employees surveyed by Workfront in July, expect the majority of employees will work remotely in the next few years.

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Women in leadership positions are often told to behave in ways that are viewed as more masculine to be successful. But it’s not that simple. Because when women act like men, their peers and employees tend to think

Women in leadership positions are often told to behave in ways that are viewed as more masculine to be successful. But it’s not that simple. Because when women act like men, their peers and employees tend to think that one thing -- that they’re bossy.

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Leadership coaching is typically reserved for the top onepercent of employees. In other words, those nearest the top are getting all the development needed to get to and stay at the top.But what about everyone else? Do they get the same opportunities?

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When companies talk about leadership development, words like "coaching"and "mentoring"often get tossedaround. Not only that, but the terms are used interchangeably. So, most listenersjust assume they mean the same thing.

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The current conversation on gender in leadership is at a standstill. Professionals and employers alike recognize there’s a problem, but can’t seem to move forward to a solution. Traditional leadership development addresses the problem by telling women to become more masculine and men to act less like jerks -- but that approach isn’t working.

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The conversation on gender and leadership centers on the same advice. Women in leadership need to be less bossy and more confident, and men need to be more understanding. It’s been said over and over again, and yet, the balance between men and women in leadership isn’t getting any better.

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